History

Although a Council of Catholic Women had been organized for some years in parts of the Diocese of Charleston, the local organizations were not cohesive and did not operate in conjunction with the guidelines of the National Council of Catholic women (NCCW). Most Reverend Emmett M. Walsh, the Sixth Bishop of Charleston, wished to organize these women’s groups throughout the diocese and have a Council that was a true affiliate of the national organization. Therefore, on December 19, 1930, he called a preliminary meeting of Catholic women who were prominent within the existing organizations. Dr. Anne Nicholson, the Field Executive of NCCW, addressed the meeting.

     

Later on January 11, 1931, Dr. Nicholson spoke again at a larger organizational meeting attended by women from all parts of South Carolina. At that time, the group adopted a constitution and approved temporary officers. The first convention of the new council was held in Charleston on April 11, 1931, where Most Reverend Joseph Schrembs, Bishop of Cleveland, Ohio, addressed the members at the Pontifical Mass offered by Bishop Walsh at the Cathedral of St. John the Baptist.

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Archival Sources:
* Catholic Diocese of Charleston 
* SCCCW | Catholic Diocese of Charleston

Since its humble beginnings, the South Carolina Council of Catholic Women (SCCCW) has been a membership of energetic women dedicated to home, church, community, and world. Staying true to the NCCW’s mission to empower and educate all Catholic Women in spirituality, leadership, and service, it still today responds to the needs of the Church and society with Gospel values. SCCCW stands ready to continue its mission and answer the challenge of Christian women in the New Millennium.

 

Additional information may be found in the Archives of the Diocese of Charleston, SC. 

1933

The Third Annual Conference of what was then, the Charleston Diocesan Council of Catholic Women, later renamed the South Carolina Council of Catholic Women, was held in Greenville, South Carolina, April 22-24, 1933.